Russell Island to Redland Bay by Water Bus

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Kookaburras Laugh every morning on the Islands

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https://sunrisetoday.wordpress.com/2015/03/09/kookaburras-and-rosellas-at-russell-island/

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What a delight it is to wake to the laughing song of the Kookaburras as they greet the morning.

Caravan and Recreational Camping in Redland Bay

Download the Caravan and RV parking reference map [PDF 923KB] for an overview of sites in the Redlands.

 Russell island

Site 3: 229 Middle Street, Cleveland 4163

Latitude: -27.5272052154, Longitude: 153.281460629

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 3 [PDF 467KB]

Site 4: 9 Masters Avenue, Victoria Point 4165

Latitude: -27.5800319895, Longitude: 153.314887364

Key required – phone Victoria Point car park (next door to the reserve) on 3207 6246 to obtain the key. A small fee will apply.

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 4 [PDF 1MB]

Opening Hours Mon – Thurs 7am – 10pm
Key can be obtained from the Victoria Point Car Park (next door). To book ring John and Joan Gosbell 3207 6246
Amenities nearby
• water taxi and barge to Coochiemudlo Island
• foreshore footpath
• water views
• cafe
• Coochiemudlo Island
• shops
• adjacent to Victoria Point Reserve
• picnic area
• public toilets
• playground
• bus service
• boat ramp

Site 6: 1-3 Peel Street, Redland Bay 4165

Latitude: -27.613648, Longitude: 153.306404

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 6 [PDF 1MB]

Picnic at Russell Island

Site 10 (Area 3): 2-34 Badgen Road, Wellington Point 4160

Latitude: -27.4891847167, Longitude: 153.229615809

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 10 [PDF 3.4MB]

SIte 11 (Area 4): 350-360 Birkdale Road, Wellington Point 4160

Latitude: -27.488083, Longitude: 153.232971

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 11 [PDF 3.4MB]

Site 12: (Area 5)15 Peterson Street, Wellington Point 4160

Latitude: -27.487264, Longitude: 153.236535

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 12 [PDF 3.4MB]

Site 13 (West): 264 Queens Esplanade, Thorneside 4158

Latitude: -27.4812128077, Longitude: 153.205927

Caravan RV parking guide – Site 13 [PDF 827KB]

Site 13 (East): 330 Queens Esplanade, Birkdale 4159

Latitude: -27.4826697575, Longitude:153.211698

Caravan RV parking guide -Site 13 [PDF 827KB]

Karragarra Island

Picnic at Karragarra

I have not checked the caravan Sites and do not know if they are overnight or simply day parking for a rest.

I am listing them here as its good to know that Redland Bay has places for caravans and camping…

Canaipa Point Russell Island

There is a great deal of evidence of Aboriginal people living on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands of Russell, Lamb, Karragarra and Macleay. On Russell Island, there is an Aboriginal crossing point from the northeast tip across Canaipa Passage to Stradbroke Island. This was the old jetty, removed because this was Aboriginal tribal Land.

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Russell Island was originally called Canaipa. It was named Russell Island in the 1840s after Lord John Russell, Secretary of State for the colonies in the 1840s.

http://www.redland.qld.gov.au/AboutRedlands/History/OurSuburbs/Pages/Southern-Moreton-Bay-Islands.aspx

Some of the first Europeans to live on the islands were convicts. When the Moreton Bay Penal Settlement was operating (between 1824 and 1842), convicts were sent to North Stradbroke Island to help with timber-getting and growing crops.
Some convicts escaped and lived on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands. Other convicts who had served their sentences and were set free also lived on the islands.
Canaipa Point
After the convict period ended in 1842, many people came to the islands for the timber.
Fishermen also moved to the islands. They hunted dugong for their oil and harvested oysters, firstly for their shells and later for their shellfish. They also farmed oysters. Oystering was the biggest fishery in southern Queensland for many years.
Farmers began to move to the islands in the 1860s. They grew cotton and sugar but these crops were not very successful so they started growing fruit instead. Later on, they grew vegetables. Some farmers swam cattle across to the islands and tried to set up herds.
One of the early fruit crops was mangoes. Some of the trees planted in the 1890s are still growing.
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Russell Island Queensland

Russell Island in Redland City is the biggest of the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, sandwiched between the mainland and North Stradbroke Island in the state of Queensland, Australia. The island is eight kilometers long (north-to-south) and nearly three kilometers wide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Island_%28Moreton_Bay%29

Russell Island

Russell had 1,779 permanent residents in 2006 up 35.9% since 2001.[5] However, this changes dramatically on weekends and holidays when many of the 30% of dwellings on the island which are classified as unoccupied are visited by their owners.[citation needed] Fast ferries and scheduled barges straddle the distance to Redland Bay quickly for most of the day.

In the 2011 Census the population of Russell Island is 2,473, 50.3% female and 49.7% male.

The median/average age of the Russell Island population is 51 years of age, 14 years above the Australian average.

68.8% of people living in Russell Island were born in Australia. The other top responses for country of birth were New Zealand 6.1%, England 5.7%, Scotland 1%, Philippines 1%, Germany 0.9%.

Yachts on the bay
Yachts on the bay

History of the Southern Moreton Bay Islands

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There is a great deal of evidence of Aboriginal people living on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands of Russell, Lamb, Karragarra and Macleay.
 On Macleay Island, Corroboree Point is believed to be a ceremonial ground and dreaming site. There is also a midden (a collection of shells, tools and bones formed after hundreds of years of gathering at that spot by Aboriginal people). Thompson’s Point was also an Aboriginal campsite and was possibly used for spotting turtles.
 On Lamb Island, Harry Brook Reserve has a midden.
 On Russell Island, there is an Aboriginal crossing point from the northeast tip across Canaipa Passage to Stradbroke Island.
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Where did the names come from?

Russell Island was originally called Canaipa. It was named Russell Island in the 1840s after Lord John Russell, Secretary of State for the colonies in the 1840s.
 Macleay Island was called Jencoomercha and in the 1840s was named after Alexander Macleay, the Colonial Secretary of NSW. At the time Queensland did not exist. All of Queensland was part of New South Wales.
 Karragarra Island has retained its indigenous name.
 Lamb Island was originally called Ngudooroo. The origins of Lamb are not clear but it is possible that it was named after British peer William Lamb, also known as Lord Melbourne.

Russell, Lamb, Macleay and Karragara Islands Settlement to 2000

The timeline to 1950 was compiled by Redland Shire Council’s Local Historian from primary and secondary sources. The post-1950 section was compiled mainly from local newspapers unless otherwise indicated.

Click here to download full version of timeline [PDF 117KB]