Old Jetty and History of Russell Island

 

Jetty

Russell Island Jetty The first settlers on the island relied on their own resources to take themselves and their produce to market. The area to the east of the current jetty was the site of the raf…

Source: Old Jetty and History of Russell Island

Old Wreck

http://moretonbay.biz/part-4-russell-island

Russell Island Jetty

The first settlers on the island relied on their own resources to take themselves and their produce to market. The area to the east of the current jetty was the site of the rafting ground, where the timber-getters would form log rafts to float their timber to sawmills on the mainland. The island’s early farmers also used this area to ship their produce before jetties were built.

Wreck at Russell Island

The jetty accesses Krummel Passage. This passage was formerly known as the Mersen or Marsden Channel, named after Christian Mersen, who selected a couple of parcels of land on Russell Island in the 1870s. He set up a lime burning kiln where he burnt local coral and oysters. This kiln was close to the lime burners’ jetty near the present water transport office and current jetty.


The area now has only relics of the past hidden behind the mangroves below the Cricket Oval where the helicopter also lands for medical emergencies.

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You can see the edges of the past jetties at low tide, and also the mooring post.

This area was once a thriving busy waterway for produce grown on the island…avocados, fruit, timber and also fresh water. There are two wells that had fresh water and the mainland as well as the other islands would also come here for fresh water before there were taps and council water.

well and Paper BarkThe two wells are now on private property and not in use as the water is not as pure as it used to be in the past, as it is now contaminated with iron and bacteria. The wells get fed continually from water seepage from the island and the water would be fresh and pure and they were the main fresh water source for those living on the islands.

18 July

This is the site of a settlement established by Mark Jackson in the 1920s. The Jackson family came to the island about 1905 and took up pineapple farming, one of the first farming families to do so. In 1915 Mark Jackson opened a pineapple cannery that employed up to 20 people in its heyday. It is famous for being one of the suppliers of canned pineapple to Allied troops fighting in France during World War I. Not long after World War I, the cannery closed and was replaced by a sawmill on the same site. Before the mill closed, it supplied timber for a number of island buildings, including a Methodist Church.

The pineapple cannery was built just above the high water mark, apparently because the equipment was too heavy to carry any further up the slope. Mark Jackson also built a jetty and a barge to take produce to the markets, as well as an enclosed swimming pool with a shark barrier. The remains of the structures can be found at the water’s edge below the site of the cannery and sawmill. No settlement is complete without entertainment, so Mark Jackson also built the Bay View Picture Theatre about 1950. Jackson donated five acres for a school oval in 1922, which is today the Jackson’s Oval cricket ground. In its heyday, Jacksonville was one of the main transport nodes, with most of the fruit boats visiting the island in those days travelling along the aptly named Main Channel that runs between Redland Bay and Russell Island. They picked up and delivered passengers and produce from the Logan River, other southern bay islands and the mainland settlements. Little remains of the Jacksonville settlement: the Methodist Church was eaten by white ants and pulled down and the picture theatre burnt down in 1960. All that is left of the pineapple cannery/sawmill are its levelled site and some remnants off Jackson Street. The remains of the jetty and barge can be found down on the water’s edge and some concrete block walls from the swimming enclosure are visible.

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Russell Island Moreton Bay Queensland

Russell Island is situated just off the coast of Brisbane, Queensland Australia. It was first settled in 1866  and become a major supply of fruit and vegetables to the Brisbane market and supplied …

Source: Russell Island Moreton Bay Queensland

Russell island

Russell Island is situated just off the coast of Brisbane, Queensland Australia.

It was first settled in 1866  and become a major supply of fruit and vegetables to the Brisbane market and supplied Australia with oysters from the many oyster farms throughout the area . Today is a cheap land, low cost living place attracting people who cannot afford living on the mainland or who like the idea of living on an island, usually to retire there with their cottage and boat and retirement lifestyles.

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There is a shopping centre with a IGA Supermarket, Chemist, Hairdresser, Take-away that is constantly changing hands and management, a PO, a Bakery and that’s it. Across the road a Police Station manned one day a week, an Ambulance station that is almost complete, a Library, a Motel, Liquor Store and 4 Estate Agents…or is it 5 or 6..There is a Cafe, a Medical Centre and an Estate Agent around the corner and a church and a Rec Hall also used as 4 churches on a Saturday and a Sunday., and the Anglican Church, an original building.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Island_%28Moreton_Bay%29

Russell had 1,779 permanent residents in 2006 up 35.9% since 2001.[5] However, this changes dramatically on weekends and holidays when many of the 30% of dwellings on the island which are classified as unoccupied are visited by their owners. Fast ferries and scheduled barges straddle the distance to Redland Bay quickly for most of the day.

In the 2011 Census the population of Russell Island is 2,473, 50.3% female and 49.7% male.

The median/average age of the Russell Island population is 51 years of age, 14 years above the Australian average. This pattern is changing in recent years with Centrelink sending people to live on the island and families bringing children and animals to live cheaper than they can on the Mainland. The pattern is changing and this is reflected in the shopping areas and Ferry travel and the number of people working for the Dole or shopping at the Community Centre Op Shop.

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68.8% of people living in Russell Island were born in Australia. The other top responses for country of birth were New Zealand 6.1%, England 5.7%, Scotland 1%, Philippines 1%, Germany 0.9%

Electricians, builders and plumbers are resident on the Island, making the island somewhat self-supportive. Services include power, phone, broadband, water and garbage collection but sewerage and tarring of the vast majority of streets is still some time away. Garbage is trucked to the mainland for disposal. The Rural Fire Brigade, State Emergency Service and the Ambulance service receive strong volunteer support. Several volunteer Justices of the peace live on the island. A small primary school for around 180 students and there is a swimming pool next door as well as the shark proof swimming enclosure next to the Jetty.

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Russell Island Queensland

Russell Island in Redland City is the biggest of the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, sandwiched between the mainland and North Stradbroke Island in the state of Queensland, Australia. The island is eight kilometers long (north-to-south) and nearly three kilometers wide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Island_%28Moreton_Bay%29

Russell Island

Russell had 1,779 permanent residents in 2006 up 35.9% since 2001.[5] However, this changes dramatically on weekends and holidays when many of the 30% of dwellings on the island which are classified as unoccupied are visited by their owners.[citation needed] Fast ferries and scheduled barges straddle the distance to Redland Bay quickly for most of the day.

In the 2011 Census the population of Russell Island is 2,473, 50.3% female and 49.7% male.

The median/average age of the Russell Island population is 51 years of age, 14 years above the Australian average.

68.8% of people living in Russell Island were born in Australia. The other top responses for country of birth were New Zealand 6.1%, England 5.7%, Scotland 1%, Philippines 1%, Germany 0.9%.

Yachts on the bay
Yachts on the bay

History of the Southern Moreton Bay Islands

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There is a great deal of evidence of Aboriginal people living on the Southern Moreton Bay Islands of Russell, Lamb, Karragarra and Macleay.
 On Macleay Island, Corroboree Point is believed to be a ceremonial ground and dreaming site. There is also a midden (a collection of shells, tools and bones formed after hundreds of years of gathering at that spot by Aboriginal people). Thompson’s Point was also an Aboriginal campsite and was possibly used for spotting turtles.
 On Lamb Island, Harry Brook Reserve has a midden.
 On Russell Island, there is an Aboriginal crossing point from the northeast tip across Canaipa Passage to Stradbroke Island.
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Where did the names come from?

Russell Island was originally called Canaipa. It was named Russell Island in the 1840s after Lord John Russell, Secretary of State for the colonies in the 1840s.
 Macleay Island was called Jencoomercha and in the 1840s was named after Alexander Macleay, the Colonial Secretary of NSW. At the time Queensland did not exist. All of Queensland was part of New South Wales.
 Karragarra Island has retained its indigenous name.
 Lamb Island was originally called Ngudooroo. The origins of Lamb are not clear but it is possible that it was named after British peer William Lamb, also known as Lord Melbourne.

Russell, Lamb, Macleay and Karragara Islands Settlement to 2000

The timeline to 1950 was compiled by Redland Shire Council’s Local Historian from primary and secondary sources. The post-1950 section was compiled mainly from local newspapers unless otherwise indicated.

Click here to download full version of timeline [PDF 117KB]