Curlews in my Garden..Russell Island

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Redlands distribution
In the Redland Shire, the islands in Moreton Bay appear to be the stronghold of
the species, particularly Coochiemudlo Island, Peel Island, Russell Island,
Macleay Island, Lamb Island, Karragarra Island and North Stradbroke Island.
Peel Island appears to have the highest density and it is also the least populated by
humans and free from feral animals and general human disturbance. The southern
region of the Redland Shire has greater numbers than the northern region.
Redland Bay, Victoria Point and Mount Cotton are recognised as supporting good
numbers. However, Capalaba, Cleveland and Alexandra Hills also support a
number of birds.
Out of the Australia total Bush curlew population, the Redlands may support at
least 1% (150 breeding pairs) of the total Australian population (based on
Watkins, 1993). Interestingly, though the English Stone curlew is a different
species (Stone curlew, Burhinus oedicnemus)

Curlew Management Wild Life Preservation Society  PDF

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Curlews stand about 54–59 cm high. An adult weighs between 625g (female) and
670g (male). They are ground feeding and nesting birds. They live to 25–30 years.
They are generally nocturnal but, when raising young, have been seen to be active
during the day. They rely heavily upon their cryptic camouflage for protection

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In the Redlands, curlews generally lay two eggs on the ground in an open area.
Contrary to some research, the nests of Redlands curlews are often close to a large
tree. There are two nestings per year starting in August/September with a second
following directly after the first and finishing early in the following year. In some
instances, there are 3 nestings per year. The curlews feed on a range of
invertebrates, small vertebrates, seeds and shoots (Marchant & Higgins 1993).
During the breeding season, they are territorial and notably more vocal, but in
winter, during the non-breeding season, they are quieter and in some areas gather
in loose small flocks.

Curlews

Sunrise...Travel Talk with Maggi

Curlews Curlews

The bush stone-curlew or bush thick-knee (Burhinus grallarius, obsolete name Burhinus magnirostris) is a large (55–60 cm wingspan),[2] ground-dwelling bird endemic to Australia. Although it looks rather like a wader and is related to the oystercatchers, avocets and plovers, it is a terrestrial predator

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The bush stone-curlew or bush thick-knee (Burhinus grallarius, obsolete name Burhinus magnirostris) is a large (55–60 cm wingspan),[2] ground-dwelling bird endemic to Australia. Although it looks rather like a wader and is related to the oystercatchers, avocets and plovers  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bush_stone-curlew

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Like most stone-curlews, it is mainly nocturnal and specialises in hunting small grassland animals: frogs, spiders, insects, molluscs, crustaceans, snakes, lizards and small mammals are all taken, mostly gleaned or probed from soft soil or rotting wood; also a few seeds or tubers, particularly in drought years. Birds usually forage individually or in pairs…

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